Monday, January 21, 2013

What am I looking at?





You know the drill.

And I fully expect Baydog to beat everyone to the punch. In fact, I'll be very disappointed if he doesn't. Very. Disappointed. Don't let me down, Baydog.

I took the picture above on Sunday afternoon, around 3pm, not long after high tide.

Where am I?

What am I looking at?

What does this place have geographically in common with the place in Mitch's post today What am I looking at?

Why does this chart explain why I was at that place above on Sunday afternoon, and not somewhere else?





What did Tillerman and Tillerwoman have for dinner?




Extra credit if you name all 8 ingredients (excluding spices, herbs and condiments etc.)


20 comments:

Baydog said...

I'm gonna try and get an early jump on this:

1. You were in southern Rhode Island.
2. You were looking at Sakonnet Lighthouse.
3. I think you were both facing South. (sorry Mitch, I never got a good chance to participate in your current geographical quiz, and when I saw that Tillerman was already deep into it, I went and did laundry)
4. Because it was way to bleepin windy to sail
Lasers in January in Newport. You were sight-seeing.
5. This one may be a bit more difficult. Spinach, Stilton, mushrooms, broiled tomato.
The rest I'll need to think about.

Baydog said...

too bleepin windy

Tillerman said...

1 and 2. We are indeed in Little Compton looking at Sakonnet Lighthouse.

3. We were both looking south. But it occurred to me that Point Lookout MD, and Sakonnet Point, RI have something much more specific in common. There's something that you might assume at first to be true of both of them, but actually it's true of neither of them. I did find a reference on Google that says the particular mistake is actually quite common in Maryland, and Mitch almost implied it in his post.

4. Right. I should have been frostbiting in Newport, but the most conservative forecast was talking about 30 knot gusts. I don't do 30 knot gusts in January. So I took the missus for a walk on the beach in Little Compton instead.

The wind chart is from Coasters Harbor Island which is quite close to where we sail. There's one thing about this chart that is a little odd in that I think it's an hour off. I think it's still on EDT. I'm guessing that because the actual wind graph always goes to about one hour in the future. So that big 40 knot gust was actually at 2pm.

18 people did race. They only completed 2 races. In the second race the leader survived a massive puff at the gybe mark but the next 7 boats capsized. Around 2pm they called it a day.

5. You're on the right track. There are greens. There was a blue cheese. Mushrooms and tomatoes are involved.

Baydog said...

Dang

bonnie said...

Very good weekend for sightseeing (unless you're a windsurfer).

Baydog said...

Arugula, beets, Maytag Blue, roasted pepper, sausage

O Docker said...

Oh geesh, I take one day off to watch Michelle Obama's husband get inaugurated and I miss all the good blog photo quizzes.

I think the one point about the two points that you might assume to be true of both points but is true of neither point is that both points are sand bars and not rocky points.

And the one in Maryland has sharks' teeth because sharks have cartilege instead of bone, so what's left of them when they decompose is just teeth and no bones.

I don't think there are any shark teeth in what you had for lunch, but there may be some bacon.

Joe Rousé said...

How the hell can you tell what is in that thing? If I saw that on my plate I would run for the nearest exit...and then I'd have stiff drink to calm my nerves!

Joe Rousé said...

...seriously, we're going to have to do some more food posts!

Mitch Zeissler said...

The one in Maryland is also locally famous for having fossilized sharks teeth. There's a whole stretch of coastline that sprouts enough of them for road-side sellers to hawk, much to the chagrin of marine archeologists.

Mitch Zeissler said...

You saw Tillerman was into it and gave up? Just like that? Sheesh. I thought you were made of sterner stuff than that, Baydog.

Tillerman said...

No sausage, no bacon. Didn't I tell you we are vegetarians?

And Joe is right. The meal looks disgusting in the pictire. But it was delicious.

Actually there is a bit of a sandbar at Sakonnet Point, but then that would be true of both points, not something that you might think to be true but isn't actually true.

Tillerman said...

Here's a clue to the geographical question.

bonnie said...

Funny, my last food post also ended up driving people to drink.

Tillerman said...

Here is another clue to the geographical question.

Tillerman said...

And here is another clue.

The clue is that all of the links in the last 3 comments assert something that is blatantly untrue.

Baydog said...

Uncle. I give up. What's in the dish, Tillerman? Some ingredients must not be visible to the naked eye...

Tillerman said...

Yeah, it doesn't quite look like the picture in the recipe! It's basically a vegetarian's alternative to a burger.

Portabella mushroom on a slice of ciabatta. The mushroom is topped with a filling of sun-dried tomatoes, regular tomatoes and onions sauteed with oil and sugar and balsamic vinegar and thyme. There are some mixed greens (which I only counted as one of the eight main ingredients.) And a cheese sauce made with creme fraiche and blue cheese (although the recipe calls for gorgonzola.) Your first guess was pretty close.

Is anybody going to have a guess at the geography question?

O Docker said...

What? Are you still waiting for someone to point out that both points are sometimes falsely assumed to be the southernmost points in their respective states?

Those in Maryland forget about Maryland's eastern shore and those in Rhode Island forget about Napatree Point and Block Island.


Tillerman said...

Yeah, that's what I was pretty much looking for.

Maryland and Rhode Island are similar states in that they are both bisected by major bays with chunks of mainland on both sides. When Mitch and I drive south from our houses, the southernmost points of land we can reach in our states are Point Lookout and Sakonnet Point respectively. But those points are not the southernmost points on the mainland of our states. Places on the mainland on the other side of the bay hold that distinction.

The Maryland folk are more confused than we Rhode Islanders though. That area where Point Lookout sits is known as Southern Maryland. Point Lookout is the southernmost point in Southern Maryland, but it is not the most southern point in Maryland. Confusing, eh? And as you can see from those links in my comments, many people get mixed up about this.

I don't think anyone in Rhode Island ever thinks Sakonnet Point is our southernmost point, although it feels like it when you go there. Perhaps it's because the area that is really the southernmost part of our mainland is known as South County. But really there is no such county. Weird, eh?

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